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Strategic Information System (SIS)

10 Mar

A Strategic Information System (SIS) is a system that helps companies change their business strategy and structure. It is typically utilised to speed up the reaction time to environmental changes and aid it in achieving a competitive advantage.

Key features of the Strategic Information Systems are the following:

1) Decision support systems that enable to develop a strategic approach to align Information Systems (IS)  with an organisation’s business strategies.

2) Primarily Enterprise resource planning solutions that integrate the business processes to meet the enterprise objectives for the optimisation of the enterprise resources.

3) Database systems with the “data mining” capabilities to make the best use of available corporate information for marketing, production, promotion and innovation. The SIS systems also facilitate identification of the data collection strategies to help optimize database marketing opportunities.

4) The real-time information Systems that intend to maintain a rapid-response and the quality indicators.

The relationship among business strategy, organizational strategy, and information strategy. It illustrates how important the business strategy is.

 

I will also add in this video on SIS which might also help explain it.

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=information+systems+strategy+&oq=information+systems+strategy+&gs_l=youtube.3..0.784.10649.0.11906.13.9.0.4.4.0.213.1159.3j5j1.9.0…0.0…1ac.1.tZ5EOkcC3fM

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Management Information Systems

10 Mar

Hey fellow bloggers today I am going to tell you a little on Management Information Systems,

Management Information Systems (MIS) is a computer system that stores and distributes information on how to successfully manage an organisation, and it is usually regarded as a subset of the internal controls of a business.

Process

Management Information Systems are an efficient and methodical approach to collecting, storing and processing raw data that underlines what needs to be done in order to handle an enterprise effectively.

Before data had to be manually inputted and consulted, which meant there was more of a risk for human errors and delays in terms of putting together the data into proper reports to facilitate management functions and it was more expensive. Nowadays, the advancement of MIS into the organised procedure that it is now has vastly improved the way businesses are run.

Analysing Data

The data stored in Management Information Systems covers various categories, such as technologies, people, documents and procedures.

Faster and more systematic than manual consulting and handling, this technology can analyse and collate raw data that it stores into reports which outline trends and patterns in decision-making and organisation functions.

Managers can then refer to these reports in order to systematically plan and direct business operations. These reports can also include knowledge about assumed scenarios resulting from prospective management-changing decisions.

MIS saves time, allowing for managers to make informed decisions more quickly, but also assist in helping those with authorisation to the information to better understand the enterprise and the nature of the industry.

This video also explains MIS very well, I hope you enjoy it.

How information systems create a competitive advantage

10 Mar

Hello bloggers how are ye all today? Have a read through this interesting article.

Technology is now one of the most important part of every business. What used to be manual are now automated, and electronic means of communication which have been become key in helping in all businesses. Since technology has been developed in recent decades it has transformed today’s business practices.

Information systems have been around for a few decades now, but as they develop, they are being outdated everyday and offer many more possibilities. IS can be used in a many ways. Many businesses today have realised the advantages technology has, but  not all businesses get the potential out of technology.

Don’t think of your IS systems as a commodity, view it as an assets and a way to gain a competitive advantage in your field.

Maximize your information systems:

• Enhance jobs

Implementing IS is expensive at first but it may mean you have to employ less people and makes jobs more efficient so employees can move onto other jobs. Staff do not have to spend valuable time sorting through statistics, data and other pertinent information because the system has ability to gather it for them. IS provides a cost-effective way to conduct transactions, significantly cutting down the time involved in processing.

• Differentiation

IS provides the capability to strategically define your organisation in a way that makes the business stand out from the competition. IS can be integrated  in such a way where customers can be offered something no one else provides. With a disctint design that makes your business appealing to do business with, you can easily increase your customer base.

• Coordination of supply and distribution

IS provides a terrific way to monitor and track inventory. Typically, managers will use information system to track goods and to manage their entire supply/chain management process. If s problem arises, you can easily pick out and find a solution before it becomes a costly issue.

• Customers

Integrating  business processes with the web is a great way to maximise your technology. You can generate efficiency, effectiveness and enhancement all at the same time. Employee work load is relieved and you can improve your customer’s shopping experience at the same time.

• Decision making

Information systems allow the key element of providing “real-time” information. In today’s competitive environment, a manager needs to make rapid decisions and to do this effectively, you will need the most up to date information available. Properly designing your IS to custom fit your needs will enable you to accomplish this. You will get fast action when you can quickly assess a situation.

The importance of Analysis and Design in business

10 Mar

Both of these topics are very closely related -you could even say, system design is a part of the System Development Life Cycle or SDLC which you may remember from Cathal’s lectures.

Firstly you have to understand what a “system” is. First of all, information systems are all around us. Think about your local supermarket, they have a system which tracks inventory levels and reorders stock as required. They also have a system which looks after the financial side of the organisation; how much money has been made from a day of trading. These systems don’t just include computers and software. They also include the people that use the system and procedures. So in short, an information system is a collection of hardware, software, data, human and procedural components intended to give the right data and information to the right person at the right time.

Systems Analysis deal with the process in which analysts go through to decide how a system should run – that is deciding what roles the system should perform, whether it’s viable for the system to be developed (such as financial feasibility; do the benefits of the system outweigh the costs of developing the system?), what data is going to be collected and stored. In essence, Systems Analysis is concerned with problem solving and having a system that will solve an organisations problems.

This is a interesting video which tells us how important system analysts are

Systems Design is actually the third step of the SDLC – it’s where the analysis designs how the system will operate. The physical components of the system are defined here which specifies how the problem at hand will be solved.

This video gives a more detailed view on System Design:

 

 

How to set up a successful Information System

10 Mar

There is a thin line when it comes to success and failure of information systems. At least 50% of information systems fail and this figure could even be higher as people do not like admitting failure, so the attention to detail becomes crucial and the risks become grater. Some of the main reasons that seem to be recurring in IS failures are due to risk management, accountability, professionalism, formal training, research, good communications, leadership and ownership. For those who do not know a lot about IS system failures I will put it in a simpler form,a  software engineer is similar to a civil engineer. Building a large information system is almost like constructing a 30-story office building. If a bunch of architects, electricians, plumbers, carpenters, tillers and contractors meet in a office room, talk for a few hours and then start building, the building will be unstable if it even gets built at all. “If building engineers built buildings with the same care as software engineers build systems, the first woodpecker that comes along would knock the building making it a failure as the build should stand after storms.

 

Three Keys to Successful IS Projects

Successful projects are like a tripod and have these factors in common:

1. Top management support 

2. A sound methodology 

3. Solid technical leadership by someone who has successfully completed a similar project

1. Almost all system success or failures have identified top management support as a critical to the success factor. The management personnel in any organisation that undertakes a systems project should be understand that the project will meet stumbling blocks along the way. They will need to be prepared to keep there composure as there will be setbacks or else the project is set for failure. From my simplified point earlier there is a massive difference between systems projects and office buildings. When a building is half built, there is something to see, but when a software project is half done, there is almost nothing to see. Managers need to know what they can expect to see and when. If they assume that the project will have 50% of the systems running when the budget is 50% spent, they will probably start thinking about giving up on the project that is progressing exactly on schedule.

2.Many systems are built with little thought. The team gets together and as enough information is collected, coding begins. This lack of attention to process can ruin a system. It is easy to see the result of a lack of attention to process after a system fails. Usually parts of the user requirements are ignored. Large amounts of code need to be rewritten, since it does not meet user requirements the first time around. The system is put into place with scarce testing. Without a well thought out process, there is little chance that a systems project will be successful. If the project does succeed, it only does so with substantial rewrites and cost overruns.

3. Like a building needs an architect, software systems needs a technical lead. The technical lead must have built similar systems down to the level of the specific business area for which the system is being built. To be successful, technical lead must be the one in control of the “architecture” of the project, most importantly the data model and application design. This level of control must be recognised and acknowledged by everyone involved with the project.

 

Ways to Guarantee the Successful Systems Project

10 Mar

There is a thin line when it comes to success and failure of information systems. At least 50% of information systems fail and this figure could even be higher as people do not like admitting failure, so the attention to detail becomes crucial and the risks become grater. Some of the main reasons that seem to be recurring in IS failures are due to risk management, accountability, professionalism, formal training, research, good communications, leadership and ownership. For those who do not know a lot about IS system failures I will put it in a simpler form,a  software engineer is similar to a civil engineer. Building a large information system is almost like constructing a 30-story office building. If a bunch of architects, electricians, plumbers, carpenters, tillers and contractors meet in a office room, talk for a few hours and then start building, the building will be unstable if it even gets built at all. “If building engineers built buildings with the same care as software engineers build systems, the first woodpecker that comes along would knock the building making it a failure as the build should stand after storms.

Three Keys to Successful IS Projects

Successful projects are like a tripod and have these factors in common:

1. Top management support 

2. A sound methodology 

3. Solid technical leadership by someone who has successfully completed a similar project

1. Almost all system success or failures have identified top management support as a critical to the success factor. The management personnel in any organisation that undertakes a systems project should be understand that the project will meet stumbling blocks along the way. They will need to be prepared to keep there composure as there will be setbacks or else the project is set for failure. From my simplified point earlier there is a massive difference between systems projects and office buildings. When a building is half built, there is something to see, but when a software project is half done, there is almost nothing to see. Managers need to know what they can expect to see and when. If they assume that the project will have 50% of the systems running when the budget is 50% spent, they will probably start thinking about giving up on the project that is progressing exactly on schedule. 

2. Many systems are built with little thought. The team gets together and as enough information is collected, coding begins. This lack of attention to process can ruin a system. It is easy to see the result of a lack of attention to process after a system fails. Usually parts of the user requirements are ignored. Large amounts of code need to be rewritten, since it does not meet user requirements the first time around. The system is put into place with scarce testing. Without a well thought out process, there is little chance that a systems project will be successful. If the project does succeed, it only does so with substantial rewrites and cost overruns.

3. Like a building needs an architect, software systems needs a technical lead. The technical lead must have built similar systems down to the level of the specific business area for which the system is being built. To be successful, technical lead must be the one in control of the “architecture” of the project, most importantly the data model and application design. This level of control must be recognised and acknowledged by everyone involved with the project.

What is an Information System?

9 Mar

Hi fellow bloggers,

Today I am here to talk about information systems as they have become massively important in the running of the world of business as technology keeps improving everyday.An information system is a set of interrelated components that collect, retrieve, process, store, and distribute information to support decision making and control in an organisation.

In recent years, society has become more reliant on information systems.
Information system itself bring the meaning of business application in the computer that manage their operations, compete in the marketplace, accounts and manage human resources.
5 key elements to information systems

Hardware-is the most obvious part of a computer-based information system. Hardware refers to the computers themselves, along with any and all peripherals, including servers, routers, monitors, printers and storage devices.

Software-Without software, the hardware wouldn’t be very useful. Software, is what tells the hardware how to function. It gathers, organizes and manipulates data and carries out instructions. Everything you do using a computer is done by the software.

Data/Information-Just as hardware cannot function without software, software cannot function without data. This is the information part of an information system, and whether that is statistical data, sets of instructions, lists of names or even graphics and animations, it is all key to a business information system.

People-are the most often overlooked and most important part of a based information system. It is people who design and operate the software, input the data, build the hardware and keep it running, write the procedures and it is ultimately people who determine the success or failure of an information system.

Procedures-It is commonly said that “procedures are to people what software is to hardware.” Procedures are the rules, descriptions and instructions for how things are done. In computer-based information systems, procedures are frequently covered in instruction or user manuals that describe how to use the hardware, software and data.

References: http://www.ehow.com/list_7656401_six-elements-information-system.html

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